[AKBC X Asia Society Webinar] Yeo (women) power: the road to women’s empowerment in Korea
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[AKBC X Asia Society Webinar] Yeo (women) power: the road to women’s empowerment in Korea

 

What could be the economic benefits of addressing gender inequality issues in South Korea?

The Australia-Korea Business Council is pleased to invite you to our upcoming webinar, “Yeo (women) power: the road towards women’s empowerment in Korea,” held in partnership with the Asia Society Australia. The Zoom webinar will be held on Tuesday 1 September at 10.00am (KST) or 11.00am (AEST).
 
South Korea is now the 11th largest economy, has the highest percentage of people with tertiary education in OECD countries and is one of the world’s most technologically advanced countries. Despite these successes, Korea has a 34% gender pay gap and the highest Glass-ceiling Index among developed countries. While Korean women are highly educated (82.3% of 25-34 year old women have completed tertiary education), only 57.6% of them are employed. Women also only make up 2% of boardrooms in 2020 and are underrepresented in politics. Alarmingly, South Korea’s birth rate is 0.98 and with a growing number of South Korean women choosing to pursue their careers over starting a family, Korea is facing a demographic crisis.
 
While some positive change is underway (feminist movements such as Me Too and Escape the Corset, and new guidelines on “gender equality in recruitment”) there is a long road ahead before Korea can benefit from the potential of its entire population.
 
To discuss what gender diversity initiatives and challenges look like in Korea and Australia, Liz Griffin, Executive Director of the Australia-Korea Business Council, will moderate a panel of business leaders, academics and thinkers including: 

Sinjung Kwon, Partner at Mazars Australia;
Dr Kyungja Jung, Senior Lecturer of Social and Political Sciences Program at University of Technology Sydney; and
Frances Cha, Author of ‘If I Had Your Face.’

Yvonne Kim, Executive Director of the Asia Society Korea Centre, will close the session.

Join this multi-disciplinary panel as we examine the social, economic, and business impact of gender inequality in South Korea, how Korea could benefit from greater empowerment from women, and what opportunities COVID-19 could bring to women in Korea

Click here to register.

About our Speakers

 

Frances Cha, Author, If I Had your Face

Frances Cha is the author of the novel If I Had Your Face. She grew up in the United States, Hong Kong and South Korea, and graduated from Dartmouth College with a BA in English Literature and Asian Studies. For her MFA in creative writing she attended Columbia University, where she received a Dean’s Fellowship.

She worked as the assistant managing editor of Samsung Economic Research Institute’s business journal in Seoul and as a travel and culture editor for CNN International in Seoul and Hong Kong. Her writing has appeared in The Atlantic, V Magazine, WWD and The Believer among other publications. Most recently, her short story “As Long As I Live” was published in the Korean-language anthology New York Story (Artizan Books, Korea).

She has taught Media Studies at Ewha Womens University, creative writing at Columbia University and Yonsei University and lectured at Seoul National University.

She lives in Williamsburg, Brooklyn with her husband and two daughters and spends summer in Seoul, Korea.

 

Sinjung Kwon

As a Partner with Mazars Sinjung is a diligent and a hard working person with optimistic attitude. She has over 18 years experience in proving clients with a broad range of services. Sinjung’s areas of expertise include corporate and business taxation, business advice on income tax, goods and services tax, capital gains tax, fringe benefits tax, etc, international corporate services, business planning and advisory services, advice on establishing new businesses and registration requirements in Australia, cash flow projection and business forecasts, mortgage advice, financial assistance to business Visa applications, Not-For-Profit organization service, foreign investment consulting and EMDG.

Having owned her own practice prior to joining Mazars (formerly Hanrick Curran), and being a Korean Australian

(Bi-Lingual in both Korean and English), Sinjung has deep understanding of Asian and local business operators.

Sinjung’s bi-lingual abilities coupled with her experience and expertise allows Sinjung’s clients to access a multidisciplined service that supports their growth and success.

 

Kyungja Jung, Senior Lecturer, Social and Political Sciences Program, UTS

Kyunga Jung is a senior lecturer at University Technology Sydney, Australia. Kyungja’s academic interests are experientially grounded in and inspired by her involvement in women’s activism in Australia and Korea. Drawing on feminist theory(s) of intersectionality of gender and sexuality her research has been interested in mapping the gendered nature of social processes from cross-cultural and interdisciplinary approaches. Her areas of research include women’s movements, women’s policy, North Korean female defectors, sex workers, violence against women, temporary migrants in particular, international students and working holiday makers. Kyungja’s research has been published in academic journals and published a book Practicing Feminism in South Korea: sexual violence and the women’s movement (London: Routledge, 2014) and a co-authored book Sex Trafficking Or Shadow Tourism?: The Lives of Foreign Sex Workers in Australia (2010 with Jang, H, Jung, K, Dalton, B and Wilson, R.) She is currently working on a co-authored book titled North Korea’s Women-led Grassroot Capitalism with Bronwen Dalton